Record Details

NHER Number:5892
Type of record:Monument
Name:St George's Nunnery

Summary

St George’s is believed to be a pre-Conquest church mentioned in the Domesday book as belonging to the Abbot of Bury. It is generally thought that St George's functioned as a parish church during the 11th and early 12th century and the Abbot of Bury established a cell of Benedictine monks from St Edmundsbury nearby, possibly as early as 1016. However, the charter of Abbot Hugh simply refers to the cell as the monastery of St George, making no reference to a separate church of that name, and it therefore remains uncertain whether the church had a parochial function. By the end of the 12th century only two monks remained on the site and around 1160 it was granted to a Benedictine Nunnery which had previously been located in Lyng. When the site was granted to the nuns the church was rebuilt and enlarged and it ceased to have any parochial capacity.
St George’s Nunnery was dissolved in 1537 and the property was purchased by Sir Richard Fulmerston. The church was converted to a house known as The Place. However, this was replaced by a new country house around 1610 and the church was converted to a barn used for grain storage, threshing, and later as a racing stable. Of the 17th century country house, only the portal of the front door and the panelling of two rooms survive, having been incorporated into a large house constructed about 1740 which remains today (NHER 51708). By the early 19th century, the Ordnance Survey 1” 1938 map marks the buildings as Place Farm. Standing remains of the Nunnery include the 12th century Chapel (NHER 51707) and Chapter House (NHER 46328), which have been converted for use by the British Trust for Ornithology, and ruins of a late medieval building which may have been constructed on the site of the 12th century hospital (NHER 46329). The 17th century house known as Nunnery Place (NHER 51708) also remains and is currently in use by the British Trust for Ornithology. Other post medieval remains within the grounds include the red brick gateway to the Nunnery precinct (NHER 46387), which was constructed around 1600, and post medieval kitchen garden walls (NHER 48871) which incorporate earlier ecclesiastical architectural fragments including cushion capitals, roll mouldings and chevrons.

Images - none

Location

Grid Reference:TL 872 822
Map Sheet:TL88SE
Parish:THETFORD, BRECKLAND, NORFOLK

Full description

St George's Nunnery
St George’s Church is believed to be a pre-Conquest church mentioned in the Domesday book (S1) as belonging to the Abbot of Bury (S2). It is generally thought that St George's functioned as a parish church during the 11th and early 12th century and the Abbot of Bury established a cell of Benedictine monks from St Edmundsbury nearby (S3), possibly as early as 1016 (S4). However, the charter of Abbot Hugh simply refers to the cell as the monastery of St George, making no reference to a separate church of that name (S5), and it therefore remains uncertain whether the church had a parochial function. By the end of the 12th century only two monks remained on the site and around 1160 it was granted to a Benedictine Nunnery which had previously been located in Lyng (S3). When the site was granted to the nuns the church was rebuilt and enlarged and it ceased to have any parochial capacity (S3).
Two other churches were also granted to the Nunnery around 1160, St Benedicts Church (also known as St Benet’s) and All Saints Church, but it remains uncertain whether either of these were located in or adjacent to the nunnery grounds (S3, S5). The only record of St Benet’s is its donation to the Nunnery around 1160, and it likely went out of use soon afterwards (S5). Blomefield (S2) believed that St Benet’s may have been located on the Suffolk side of Thetford, but did not know its location. It was likely located outside the grounds of the Nunnery and may be the church excavated at St Michael’s Close in 1939 and 1970 (NHER 5759) which had previously been identified as St Michael’s (S5). All Saints Church may have stood near the west gate of the Nunnery. This location for All Saints was suggested by Tom Martin in the 18th century (S6), existing foundations were described by Blomefield in the early 19th century (S2), and a tithe award pertaining to the nuns which describes a plot as lying near All Saints Church (S5) confirms this conjectured location. All Saints Church was still in use in 1368, but it may have fallen into disuse soon afterwards as there are no further records of it (S5).
St George’s Nunnery was dissolved in 1537 and the property was purchased by Sir Richard Fulmerston (S4). The church was converted to a house known as The Place (S4). However, this was replaced by a new country house around 1610 (S4) and the church was converted to a barn used for grain storage, threshing, and later as a racing stable (S4). Of the 17th century country house, only the portal of the front door and the panelling of two rooms survives, having been incorporated into a large house constructed about 1740 which remains today (S4) (NHER 51708). In the 18th century, Tom Martin noted that the end of the church was in use as a barn and illustrated a 15th century Perpendicular chapel window and a heraldic fragment (S6). In 1727 he also illustrated a portion of a Jacobean mansion while it was being demolished (S6). This may have been the country house constructed in 1610. By the early 19th century, the Ordnance Survey 1” 1938 map marks the buildings as Place Farm.
Standing remains of the Nunnery include the 12th century Chapel (NHER 51707) and Chapter House (NHER 46328), which have been converted for use by the British Trust for Ornithology, and ruins of a late medieval building which may have been constructed on the site of the 12th century hospital (NHER 46329). The 17th century house known as Nunnery Place (NHER 51708) also remains and is currently in use by the British Trust for Ornithology. Other post medieval remains within the grounds include the red brick gateway to the Nunnery precinct (NHER 46387), which was constructed around 1600, and post medieval kitchen garden walls (NHER 48871) which incorporate earlier ecclesiastical architectural fragments including cushion capitals, roll mouldings and chevrons.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 05 November 2008.

19th century. Casual Find.
Two medieval keys were found at the Nunnery.
These were drawn in the Bulwer Collection (S7).
See note in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 28 October 2008.

Between 1900 and 1910. Casual Observation.
Three stone coffins were unearthed during building operations.
These have been recorded within a photograph taken by Councillor Killick which has been deposited with Notes on Martin's History of Thetford in Garsett House.
See note in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 28 October 2008.

April to May 1957. Test Trenching (G. Knocker).
29 test trenches were excavated in southeast Thetford in order to assess the extent of Late Saxon occupation and locate a former ford in the area of Nuns' Bridges. Four of these were located within the vicinity of the Nunnery.
NB 15 was located at the junction of Nunnery Drive and Nun's Bridge's Road. This was described as a rubbish dump, presumably composed of recent material.
NB 11 and NB 13 were located just east of Nunnery Drive (northwest of existing buildings). No details of NB11 were recorded, but the test trench appears to have yielded bone fragments and two sherds of 'late' pottery which have since been lost. A hard, stoney gravel containing a few bones was recorded in NB13.
NB 28 was located just south of the grounds of the Nunnery in order to investigate a bank. The bank was described as relatively recent. However, an east-west ditch containing 'late medieval tiles' (later lost) was recorded north of the bank.
See (S8) for further details.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 28 October 2008.

September 1985. Site Visit.
Structural remains on the site were examined by A. Rogerson during a brief site visit. Two blocked arches which may date to the 13th century were noted in the south wall of the chapel (NHER 51707). The ground floor features small, possibly 15th century, straight headed windows with a clerestory above, suggesting that the chapel did not have aisles. The base of possible crossing piers was also identified.
A small building (NHER 46328) investigated to the southeast of the chapel was found to have low ground floor store rooms and a formerly vaulted room above, as shown on old prints in the house.
A roofless structure (NHER 46329) was noted to be in line with the east range of the cloister site and it was suggested that this may have been a reredorter or an infirmary.
Abbey Cottages, located to the west, appear to be converted medieval buildings and the current house (NHER 51708) likely has a medieval core.
See note in file (A. Rogerson, 6 September 1985).
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

September 1985. Field Observation.
Footings for a new house at the north end of the site were observed. Natural sand was present a a depth of 1.00m to 1.10m within all of the trenches with the exception of the west end where it was not reached until a depth of 1.20m to 1.30m. This greater depth may be a result of a shallow feature or features. The virtual absence of any bone, shell, or other debris indicates that occupation did not extend into this area. One sagging base of Late Saxon Thetford type pottery was recovered from the topsoil.
See note in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

1987. Revised Listing by S. Heywood.
Nunnery Place House: See NHER 51708 for description.
Nunnery Barn: See NHER 51707 for description.
Ruin to South: See NHER 46329 for description.
Nos. 1-3 Nunnery Cottages. SEE NHER 46388 for description.
Garages south of Nunnery Barn: See NHER 46328 for description.
Gateway: See NHER 46387 for description.
Wall: See NHER 48871 for description.
Extracted from Listing by E. Rose (NAU), 7 April 1987.

February 1988. Casual observation.
A member of the public [1] observed two wall footings within a British Telecom trench located approximately 30 feet from the west end of the Nunnery Chapel (known as the Nunnery Barn). The footing were 18 to 24 inches thick and at least three feet deep, constructed of stone, flint, chalk and mortar. This suggests that the walls are a continuation of or an attachment to the chapel.
Human remains were also observed near the northwest corner of the barn and it was reported that additional human remains had been found in the vicinity about twenty years prior.
See (S9) and note in file for further details.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

October 1988. Building Survey.
A detailed survey of the fabric of the standing buildings within the Nunnery grounds was carried out.
See note in secondary file for NHER 5892 (with references to S20) for further details.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 05 November 2008.

October 1988. Casual Find. Context 2.
Several animal bones and molluscs and three sherds of unglazed medieval pottery were recovered from an area of bare soil around the pond. This material appears to have been from dredgings.
See note in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

November 1988 - January 1989. Excavation.
A small trench was excavated adjacent to the southwest crossing pier of the Nunnery Chapel (now a barn) in order to expose the base of the crossing pier and allow it to be displayed following conversion of the building for the British Trust for Ornithology.
The lower edge of the crossing pier was marked by a mortar apron and rested on natural sand. This was overlain by levelling material and a layer of compacted crushed mortar which was likely the original chapel floor. To the east of the pier, this was overlain by a medieval tiled floor predominantly composed of worn Flemish green and 'yellow' glazed tile. This medieval floor extended beyond the excavated area to the south and east, but had clearly been robbed to the north where several bricks, tiles of English manufacture, and a flat-topped piece of limestone had been incorporated into the floor and several large Flemish tile fragments appeared to have been re-set. To the west of the pier, a small area of another floor consisting of a tile and a brick set on mortar was identified. This was at the same level as the tiled floor and both were likely constructed in the 14th or 15th century. At some time during the use of this floor, the church was burnt. The burning of the ashlar surface of the pier was found to stop abruptly at the level of the floor. However no ash or charcoal deposits were found on the floor, indicating that it was likely cleaned before a clay layer was deposited, forming another floor. Within the south transept, post medieval bricks and tiles and several substantial flat-topped pieces of limestone were set into this clay floor. This in turn was overlain by a further chalky clay floor and a bituminous floor, a brick floor, and the modern concrete floor.
See (S19), (S14), and note in file for further details.
See (S10) for further details of building conversions.
See also press cuttings (S15 - S18) for details of conversion.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

January 1989. Casual Find. Context 2.
Two additional medieval pottery sherds, one glazed and one unglazed, were recovered from the pond. One of the sherds is likely Grimston ware.
See note in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 31 October 2008.

January 1989. Building Recording.
The walls of the Nunnery chapel (now known as Nunnery Barn) were stripped down prior to conversion for use by the British Trust for Ornithology and recorded in detail.
See (S19) and (S23) as well as preliminary description by E. Rose and plans in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 03 November 2008.

April 1989. Site Visit.
Further inspection of the chapel (NHER 51707) confirmed that all the ground floor domestic windows in the south wall of the barn are false, but those in a similar position in the south transept west wall were originally open.
The brick stack inserted in the window in the transept east wall has a blocked upper fireplace.
In the north wall of the house (NHER 51708) there are in fact two blocked windows just visible - one small and square, the other rectangular and upright, like a sash window. They are between the present ground and upper floor. This presumably shows there may be other windows carefully blocked, and that this end of the house has been raised, but the windows do not appear to be ancient. It is probable that only stripping down the interior of the building could give a satisfactory account of its development.
E. Rose (NAU), 20 April 1989.

February 1991. Field observation.
Excavation of a gas pipe trench west of the Nunnery Barn (former chapel, NHER 51707) revealed the same features observed in 1988 (see above). These were again identified as brick and chalk footings including some dressed stone. The remains were observed by Oliver Bone of the Thetford Museum.
See sketch plan in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 03 November 2008.

January 1994. Site visit.
The buildings are now the headquarters of the British Ornithological Trust. The house (NHER 51708) has been converted to offices and a link portico made to the former church (NHER 51707). The south transept now has an upper floor - the lower east fireplace is still exposed, the upper one covered. The base of the spiral stairs is open, but the top covered. All the walls are rendered internally. The brick and tile pavement excavated at the southwest crossing pier has been conserved and left open. The crossing arch is open, and the north crossing arch exposed. The west half of the church was not accessible. The roof has been retained.
E. Rose (NLA), 27 January 1994.

August 1994. Casual Find.
Several sherds of pottery were recovered from molehills immediately west of the west gateway (NHER 46387). These were identified as a jar rim, a body sherd of Thetford type ware, and two possible body sherds.
See location plan in file.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 03 November 2008.

January 2000. Evaluation. Contexts 20-61.
Two trenches were excavated in the central-north part of the garden, across the site of a proposed new building.
Three small undated pits or post holes were recorded in the northern trench. No finds were recovered from these features and they were sealed by a layer containing occasional fragments of animal bone, brick, tile and charcoal which may have been deliberately dumped material. An additional possible pit or area of disturbance filled with mortar, crushed chalk and clunch was recorded in section. This was likely a demolition dump.
The southern trench was located within the area of a very large disturbance, possibly a large pit or a series of pits. Excavation was carried out to a depth of 2.5m but the base of the feature was not reached. The pit cut a deposit of large lumps of chalk which extended east for about 1m at the bottom of the excavated area. This appeared to be dumped construction debris rather than the remains of a structure and was overlain by a deposit of burnt clay.
Two sherds of residual medieval pottery and nine sherds of late 15th to 16th century pottery were recovered during machining of the southern trench. The post medieval pottery includes a sherd from a Raeren stoneware jug, a common import from the Rhineland in the late 15th to 16th century. Small finds included a possible iron knife blade, a fragment of lead window came, and a piece of medieval window glass. Other finds include medieval brick, post medieval flat roof tile, oyster, mussel, and cockle shell, and a small quantity of animal bone (all from the southern trench) consisting primarily of sub-adult cattle and sheep but also including juvenile pig, adult goose, pheasant, rabbit, and fish.
A residual flint flake likely of Late Neolithic to Bronze Age date was also recovered.
See (S11) and (S12) for further details.
See also (S22).
H. Hamilton (NLA), 03 November 2008.

February and June 2000. Watching Brief. Contexts 62-88.
Groundworks for the construction of two new buildings in the central-north part of the garden were monitored.
In the northern portion of the site, deposits of mixed sand and subsoil with apparent dumps of demolition debris were observed. The debris consisted of large quantities of mortar and chalk.
In the centre of the site, several deposits were identified which appeared to be filling the north edge of the large disturbance which had been previously identified in the southern evaluation trench (see above), and in the southern portion of the site the majority of the pits excavated for the building foundations also cut into this feature. Dumps of chalky rubble were identified wihtin the fill of the feature, and several pieces of waterlogged wood were recovered from the lowest levels of one of the excavated areas. One of the wood pieces bore tool marks and was notched at either end, likely forming joints. The centre of the feature was determined to extend more than four metres deep, and the edge was identified in the southeast. The nature of this large disturbance remains uncertain, but it appears to have been infilled sometime in the late 15th or early 16th century. Much of the building material recovered from the site may have been associated with the decline and dissolution of the Nunnery, but there is no evidence for structures in this area of the grounds and therefore the origin of the material cannot be certain. Material from the demolished Nunnery is present elsewhere within the garden. Worked stone fragments have been incorporated into the garden wall (NHER 48871) and a pile of building stone was observed which had collected from the topsoil by the gardener. Additional chalk, flint and mortar rubble was also recorded during excavation of an east-west drain trench located in the extreme north of the site.
Three residual sherds of Thetford ware were recovered from a dump of demolition debris along with several sherds of early post medieval pottery. Small finds include unidentified copper alloy and iron artefacts, four pieces of window glass (one possibly of medieval date), and a reused fragment of a lava quernstone. Other finds include medieval and post medieval brick, post medieval flat roof tile, and two fragments of late 14th to 16th century Flemish floor tile.
See (S11) and (S12) for further details.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 03 November 2008.

February-March 2005. Evaluation by trial trenching. Contexts 100-141.
Excavations revealed two small, shallow, undated pits. One of the pits contained large quantities of animal bone, suggesting disposal of food waste. These were sealed beneath a layer of post medieval building rubble comprised of brick and tile. This layer was cut by four post holes containing post medieval brick and tile, indicating timber buildings in the yard area at some time in the post medieval period.
The footing of the yard wall was also exposed within a test trench. The wall is comprised of chalk, sandstone, flint and limestone blocks as well as brick in a yellowish brown mortar.
See (S13) for further details.
See also (S21).
A. Cattermole (NLA) 14 April 2007.

Monument Types

  • DITCH (Unknown date)
  • PIT (Unknown date)
  • POST HOLE (Unknown date)
  • RUBBISH PIT (Unknown date)
  • FINDSPOT (Late Neolithic to Early Bronze Age - 3000 BC to 1501 BC)
  • FINDSPOT (Late Saxon - 851 AD to 1065 AD)
  • PRIORY (Late Saxon to Medieval - 1016 AD? to 1160 AD)
  • CHURCH (Late Saxon to Medieval - 1035 AD? to 1537 AD)
  • DITCH (Medieval - 1066 AD? to 1539 AD?)
  • FINDSPOT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • INHUMATION (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • WALL (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • NUNNERY (Medieval - 1160 AD to 1537 AD)
  • FLOOR (Medieval - 1300 AD to 1499 AD)
  • FINDSPOT (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • GATE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • GREAT HOUSE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • POST HOLE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • TIMBER FRAMED BUILDING (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • WALL (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)

Associated Finds

  • ANIMAL REMAINS (Unknown date)
  • CAME (Undated)
  • KNIFE? (Undated)
  • MOLLUSCA REMAINS (Unknown date)
  • NAIL (Undated)
  • OYSTER SHELL (Unknown date)
  • POT (Unknown date)
  • QUERN (Undated)
  • UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT (Undated)
  • UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT (Undated)
  • UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT (Unknown date)
  • FLAKE (Late Neolithic to Early Bronze Age - 3000 BC to 1501 BC)
  • POT (Late Saxon - 851 AD to 1065 AD)
  • ANIMAL REMAINS (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • BRICK (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • COFFIN (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FLOOR TILE (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • HUMAN REMAINS (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • KEY (LOCKING) (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • MOLLUSCA REMAINS (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • POT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • WINDOW GLASS (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FLOOR TILE (Medieval to Post Medieval - 1350 AD to 1599 AD)
  • ANIMAL REMAINS (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • BRICK (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • FISH REMAINS (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • POT (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • ROOF TILE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • WINDOW GLASS (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)

Protected Status

  • Listed Building
  • Listed Building

Sources and further reading

---Unpublished document: British Trust for Ornithology. n.d.. The History of the Nunnery of St George..
---Article in serial: Gurney, D (ed.). 1990. Excavations and Surveys in Norfolk 1989. Norfolk Archaeology. Vol XLI Pt I pp 107-112. p 112.
---Article in serial: Gurney, D. (ed.). 1991. Excavations and Surveys in Norfolk 1990. Norfolk Archaeology. Vol XLI Pt II pp 240-246. p 245.
---Archive: Clarke, R. R. and NCM Staff. 1933-1973. Norwich Castle Museum Record Card - Late Saxon. Thetford.
---Archive: Clarke, R. R. and NCM Staff. 1933-1973. Norwich Castle Museum Record Card - Medieval. Thetford.
---Secondary File: Secondary file.
---Rolled Plan: Large Plan Exists.
---Fiche: Exists.
<S1>Publication: Brown, P (ed.). 1984. Domesday Book: Norfolk. Parts 1 and 2.
<S2>Serial: Blomefield, F.. 1805. An Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk.. Vol II. p 74.
<S3>Publication: Batcock, N. 1991. The Ruined and Disused Churches of Norfolk. East Anglian Archaeology, 51. Microfiche 5:G12.
<S4>Monograph: British Trust for Ornithology. n.d.. The history of the site and its existing buildings..
<S5>Monograph: Dallas, C. 1993. Excavations in Thetford by B. K. Davison between 1964 and 1970. East Anglian Archaeology. No 62. Pp 208-9.
<S6>Monograph: Martin, T.. 1779. History of Thetford.. pp 12, 13.
<S7>Illustration: Bulwer, J.. Bulwer Collection drawing. IVE.
<S8>Monograph: Rogerson, A. and Dallas, C. 1984. Excavations in Thetford 1948-59 and 1973-80. East Anglian Archaeology. No 22. Pp 53-4.
<S9>Correspondence: Percy, G.. 1988. Letter regarding Planning Applications nos. 3/87/1672 and 3/88/0110. The Nunnery, Thetford.. 25 February.
<S10>Graphic material: Various. Various. Architectural plans.. 1988.
<S11>Unpublished document: Bates, S.. 2000. NAU Report No. 522. Report on an Archaeological Evaluation and Watching Brief at the Walled Garden, Nunnery Place, Thetford..
<S12>Photograph: 2000. JRS 18-21.
<S13>Unpublished document: Peachey, M.. 2005. Archaeological Project Services Report No. 47/05. Archaeological Evaluation at St George's Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk..
<S14>Photograph: EQL 7-10, EQT 1-20.
<S15>Newspaper Article: Eastern Daily Press. 31 Jan 1986.
<S16>Newspaper Article: Eastern Daily Press. 24 Dec 1986.
<S17>Newspaper Article: Eastern Daily Press. 31 Oct 1987.
<S18>Newspaper Article: Eastern Daily Press. 19 Nov 1991.
<S19>Article in serial: Andrews, P. 1993. St. George's Nunnery, Thetford. Norfolk Archaeology. Vol XLI Pt IV pp 427-440.
<S20>Illustration: Wilkinson. 1822. Illustrations of Thetford.
<S21>Article in serial: Gurney, D. and Penn, K. 2006. Excavations and Surveys in Norfolk in 2005. Norfolk Archaeology. Vol XLV Pt I pp 124-136. p 134.
<S22>Article in serial: Gurney, D. and Penn, K. (eds). 2001. Excavations and Surveys in Norfolk 2000. Norfolk Archaeology. XLIII Pt IV pp 707-728. p 726.
<S23>Article in serial: Nenk, B. S., Margeson, S. and Hurley, M. 1991. Medieval Britain and Ireland in 1990. Medieval Archaeology. Vol XXXV pp 126-238. p178.

Related records

51707Parent of: Nunnery Chapel: Conventual church of Benedictine nunnery of St George (Building)
46388Parent of: Nunnery Cottages, Nuns Bridges Road (Building)
46387Parent of: Nunnery Gateway, Nunnery Drive (Building)
51708Parent of: Nunnery Place House (Building)
46328Parent of: Office immediately south of Nunnery Barn, Nuns Bridge Road (Building)
46329Parent of: Remains of St George's Nunnery in the grounds of Nunnery Place, Nuns Bridges Road (Building)
48871Parent of: Walls running south from 1, 2 and 3 Nunnery Cottages (Building)

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