Record Details

NHER Number:51301
Type of record:Building
Name:King's Lynn Railway Station, Blackfriars Road

Summary

The first station at King's Lynn was a timber building constructed in 1846 and the present gault brick building was constructed in 1871-2 by Robert Skipper of Dereham. Although it was built by Great Eastern Railway, the station was also used by the Great Northern Railway and the Midland Railway which had connections to east and west. These were amalgamated into the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway in 1893, and their presence continued with offices at King's Lynn until 1936. The station was improved and added to in 1910 and it has not been greatly changed since apart from the removal of the porte-cochere and the abandonment of one of the main platforms. It remains a well-preserved example of an unusual design of station, but it now only has electric trains south to Ely and on to London.

Images - none

Location

Grid Reference:TF 62283 20061
Map Sheet:TF62SW
Parish:KING’S LYNN, WEST NORFOLK, NORFOLK

Full description

The first station at King's Lynn was a timber building constructed in 1846.
The present gault brick building was constructed for the Great Eastern Railway in 1871-2 by Robert Skipper of Dereham.
Traffic increased at this time due to the opening of the Lynn and Sutton Bridge Railway in 1864 and also partly to the purchase of Sandringham House by Queen Victoria (see NHER 13591). It was built by Great Eastern Railway, but was also used by the Great Northern Railway and the Midland Railway, which had connections to east and west. These were amalgamated into the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway in 1893, and their presence continued with offices at King's Lynn until 1936. The station was improved and added to in 1910, again because of the enhanced popularity of the area in the Edwardian period. It is perhaps significant that its name was changed from Lynn to King's Lynn on 01/01/1911. The station has not been greatly changed since apart from the removal of the porte-cochere and the abandonment of one of the main platforms. The station was listed in 2001 as a well-preserved example of an unusual design of station. It now only has electric trains south to Ely and on to London.
Information from (S1).
H. Hamilton (NLA), 05 March 2008.

1977.
A set of tools presented to Mr. Edwin Elmer Durrant (mayor of Lynn in 1871) which were used to lay the foundation stone for King's Lynn railway station were presented to King's Lunn Museum.
Information from press cutting (S2).
H. Hamilton (NLA), 05 March 2008.

See press cutting (S3) for 1914 photograph of the team of 51 horses which pulled wagons in the good sheds at King's Lynn station and Lynn docks.
H. Hamilton (NLA), 05 March 2008.

Monument Types

  • RAILWAY STATION (Post Medieval - 1846 AD to 1871 AD)
  • RAILWAY STATION (Post Medieval to Modern - 1871 AD to 2050 AD)

Associated Finds - none

Protected Status

  • Listed Building

Sources and further reading

---Secondary File: Secondary file.
<S1>Scheduling record: English Heritage. List of Buildings of Historical and Architectural Interest.
<S2>Newspaper Article: 1977. Eastern Daily Press. 24 March. 24 March.
<S3>Newspaper Article: 1993. Eastern Daily Press. 5 March. 5 March.

Related records

37378Parent of: Medieval brick finds and post medieval structural remains (Monument)
13594Related to: East Anglian Railway, originally known as Lynn and Ely (Monument)
13592Related to: King's Lynn Dock Railway (Monument)
13600Related to: Route of Lynn and Dereham Railway (later Great Eastern) (Monument)
13591Related to: Route of Lynn and Hunstanton Railway (Monument)
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