Record Details

NHER Number:21661
Type of record:Building
Name:Moat Farm, Bedingham - building and moat

Summary

A medieval open hall timber framed house of the 16th century, with later 19th century additions of a brick skin and west wing. It is associated with moats/ponds.

Images

  • Moat Farm, a 14th or 15th century timber framed hall house in Bedingham. This photo shows the queenpost roof.  © Norfolk Museums & Archaeology Service

Location

Grid Reference:TM 2833 9103
Map Sheet:TM29SE
Parish:BEDINGHAM, SOUTH NORFOLK, NORFOLK

Full description

March 1985. Visit.
Very fine medieval open hall house with three queenpost trusses, screens passage, service doors, solar stairs etc. Later inserted stack and floor. 19th century brick skin and west wing.
Derelict in 1985 owned by owner below but for sale.
Note Listing is grade III only so no protection at present. (Upgraded to II. E. Rose.)
See (S1) in file. (S2).
E. Rose (NAU) 19 August 1985.

Site has appearance of two linked ponds. Owner says this is correct, he cut a channel to link ponds a few years ago. Pond cleaned out to 1.8m (6 feet) to reveal flint bottom. Legend say pond used for cattle, also house was moat hall, rather than moat.
H. Paterson (A&E), 3 July 2000.

Management Statement signed 15 July 2000.
See copy in office file.
H. Paterson (A&E) 24 August 2000.

Monument Types

  • HALL HOUSE (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • MOAT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • HOUSE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)

Associated Finds - none

Protected Status

  • Listed Building

Sources and further reading

---Secondary File: Secondary file.
---Photograph: CTH 7-13, CVS 34-36.
<S1>Unpublished document: E. Rose. 1985. Building Report..
<S2>Scheduling record: English Heritage. List of Buildings of Historical and Architectural Interest.

Related records - none

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