Roman coin

Roman coins were used in Britain from before the invasion of AD 45 to the 4th century AD. Gold, silver and copper alloy coins were produced in mints around the Empire, some of which were portable. These coins were mainly used as money and many small copper alloy coins were made to support a complex economy, especially in the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The relationships between the values of the different denominations was quite complex:

 

1

aureus

gold

25

denarii

silver

100

sestertii

brass (copper and zinc)

200

dupondii

brass (copper and zinc)

400

asses

copper

 

In the 3rd and 4th centuries these relationships changed significantly and new types of coin were produced. Roman coins are sometimes found in hoards that were deposited throughout the period across the county. These may have been buried for safekeeping at times of stress or as gifts to the gods.

A Roman silver denarius coin of Julia Maesa from Caister-On-Sea.

A Roman silver denarius coin of Julia Maesa from Caister-On-Sea. NWHCM 1947.171.575:A (© NCC)

 A Roman dupondius coin, perhaps from Burnham Overy.

A Roman dupondius coin, perhaps from Burnham Overy. NWHCM 1938.121.1:A (© NCC)

 

The obverse of a Roman as coin from the site of a Roman temple in Caistor St Edmund.

The obverse of a Roman as coin from the site of a Roman temple in Caistor St Edmund. NWHCM 1929.152.11:A (© NCC)

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