Record Details

NHER Number:8068
Type of record:Monument
Name:Site and remains of Wroxham Hall

Summary

Wroxham Hall is thought to have been built in 1781, using the stairs from the Great Tower at Caister Castle as a string course. It was demolished around 1960. The remaining buildings include a service range at the northwest of the original hall, the main building of which is a single storey stable block. This is of yellow brick with a slate roof, central cupola and clock, and appears to date from 1781. Adjoining this is a white brick two storey house and outbuildings. To the east of these is an exceptionally fine water tower of white brick, which probably dates to around 1860. Other buildings survive, which may have been the west end of the main hall block, but this is unclear. The majority of the hall footings are now a yard, and the location of the Catholic chapel which was erected when the family converted in the mid 19th century, is unknown.

Images

  • Outbuildings at Wroxham Hall.  © Norfolk Museums & Archaeology Service
  • Water tower at Wroxham Hall.  © Norfolk Museums & Archaeology Service

Location

Grid Reference:TG 2819 1660
Map Sheet:TG21NE
Parish:WROXHAM, BROADLAND, NORFOLK

Full description

Portions of hall built 1781 demolished around 1960.

The remaining buildings include a service range to the north west of the original complex. The main remaining building is apparently a single storey stable block with dormers above, built in yellow brick with a slate roof. This block has a central cupola and clock. Adjoining this building to the west is a white brick two-storey house, apparently later. To the north are various sheds, outbuildings and a covered yard, probably 19th century additions. To the east of these buildings is the water tower, of white brick, with a very tall base, dating from around 1860. To the south of the range of buildings is a large, low building of red brick with a yellow brick extension to the west. Much of the original material of this building has been altered, to provide access for large machinery.

The site of the central and eastern sections of the hall are now a yard, and large modern barns have been erected to the south.

The location of the Roman Catholic chapel, presumably added when the family were converted to Catholicism in the mid 19th century, is not clear. A small building visible on early Ordnance Survey maps and located to the north east of the hall may have been the chapel. No trace of this building remains.
See notes in file.
E. Rose (NAU), 25 May 1983.

Monument Types

  • BARN (18th Century to 21st Century - 1781 AD? to 2100 AD)
  • GREAT HOUSE (18th Century to 21st Century - 1781 AD? to 2100 AD)
  • STABLE (18th Century to 21st Century - 1781 AD? to 2100 AD)
  • CHAPEL (19th Century to Mid 20th Century - 1830 AD? to 1960 AD?)
  • WATER TOWER (19th Century to 21st Century - 1860 AD? to 2100 AD)

Associated Finds - none

Protected Status

  • SHINE

Sources and further reading

---Record Card: NAU Staff. 1974-1988. Norfolk Archaeological Index Primary Record Card.
---Secondary File: Secondary File.
---Photograph: CLD32-6.

Related records

8077Parent of: Post medieval ice-house (Monument)

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