Record Details

NHER Number:39689
Type of record:Building
Name:Andrew's Wall

Summary

A section of probably early 17th century flint, brick and mortar former quay wall, now some distance from the sea.

Images - none

Location

Grid Reference:TG 08505 43760
Map Sheet:TG04SE
Parish:SALTHOUSE, NORTH NORFOLK, NORFOLK

Full description

1997 - 1998.
Freestanding ruined wall of flint and mortar. Despite local legends of an earlier origin, listed (S1) in 2003 as an early 17th century quay wall, shown on (S2) (though by this date, 1649, the water to the north had been replaced by marshes). Reproductions of the map however may be misleading.
See full details in file.
E. Rose (NLA), 25 September 2003.

December 2004. Land-based fieldwork phase of the Norfolk Rapid Coastal Survey. NHER 41014, context 16.
A flint and mortar wall, orientated east-to-west and built into a sea defence bank. Approximately 40m long and located between TG 08500 43768 and TG 08529 43765, it survived to a height of 0.54m. Possibly a former quay wall, it is labelled 'Andrew’s Wall' on a map from 1649.
See (S3) for further details.
A. Cattermole (NLA), 6 December 2007.

Monument Types

  • WHARF (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • WALL (Post Medieval - 1600 AD to 1900 AD)

Associated Finds - none

Protected Status

  • Listed Building

Sources and further reading

---Secondary File: Secondary file.
<S1>Scheduling Record: English Heritage. National Heritage List for England.
<S2>Map: Hunt. 1649. Description of Kelling and Salthouse Marshes.
<S3>Unpublished Document: Robertson, D., Crawley, P., Barker, A., and Whitmore, S.. 2005. NAU Report No. 1045. Norfolk Rapid Coastal Zone Archaeological Survey. Assessment Report and Updated Project Design..

Related records

41014Parent of: Post medieval and World War Two features and structures (Monument)

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