Record Details

NHER Number:13118
Type of record:Building
Name:Crabgate Farm Stables

Summary

A mid 17th to early 18th century single storey timber framed stable with brick infill, partially rebuilt in the 19th century. Inside are many original beams and features. Stables of this period which retain contemporary fixtures are rare, and this example, despite alteration, is a significant survival.

Images - none

Location

Grid Reference:TG 0982 2748
Map Sheet:TG02NE
Parish:WOOD DALLING, BROADLAND, NORFOLK

Full description

January 1978. Visited.
Barn at Crabgate Farm.
Small 18th century timber framed barn with brick nogging.
Poor condition.
E. Rose (NAU), 25 January 1978.

However reference (S1) says the building is certainly 17th century and contains a stable of great rarity as well as a barn. Tiebeams rest on expanded wallposts and roof has collars and butt purlins. Barn has tiebeams and arched braces.
E. Rose (NLA), 13 January 1995.

Listed 1999 (S2) as rare 17th century stable with fittings

September 2012
In view of the dangerous condition of the building, Broadland District Council agreed to 'the minimum amount of dismantling required to make the building safe, subject to materials being stored on site' and a photographic record.
A. Yardy (HES), 16 November 2012.

Monument Types

  • BARN (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • STABLE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)
  • TIMBER FRAMED BUILDING (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)

Associated Finds - none

Protected Status

  • Listed Building

Sources and further reading

<S1>Publication: Wade-Martins, S.. 1994. Norfolk Farmsteads Thematic Survey. p.31-2.
<S2>Scheduling record: English Heritage. List of Buildings of Historical and Architectural Interest.

Related records

MNO11684Related to: Stables at Crabgate Farm, Crabgate, WOOD DALLING (Revoked)

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